What has Changed and What has Remained the Same in the K Series Cabin

what has changed and what has remained the same in the K Series cabin

One of the main queries from the Australian trucking industry is going to be simply about what has changed and what has remained the same in the K Series cabin, following the release of the Kenworth K220.

The answers to the questions are likely to reassure the Kenworth traditionalists when looking at the exterior, but, at the same time, the interior may reassure those looking for the truck to be brought right up to date in terms of technology and driver comfort.

The many iterations of what is basically the same cabin have come a long way since the first K Series cabover left the Bayswater production line back in 1971, and they have brought us a long way, with a familiar shape, but a much more modern cabin evolving over time. 

Looking at the truck from the outside, the most obvious change is the new shape radiator grille. Gone is the oval shape, which did attract some criticism at its launch, to be replaced with a design with echoes of the original rectangular grille, but with a modern splayed out design. It keeps with the tradition, while looking entirely new, at the same time.

what has changed and what has remained the same in the K Series cabin

The other external giveaway on most of the models, is the new roof, although there is still a flat roof option. Gone is the old Aerodyne, to be replaced with a similar shaped high roof, but one without the instantly recognisable vista windows in the front. The new roof design is claimed by Kenworth to represent a four per cent improvement in aerodynamics.

There are now new LED headlamps with integrated indicators and daytime running lights (DRL) that can be paired with bright look bezels. 

Climbing up into the cabin still involves the ladder behind the front wheel and the shuffle across to the door. The fold out steps are still an option, but they still remain a minority choice in the market. 

what has changed and what has remained the same in the K Series cabin

Stepping in through that door and into the cabin does demonstrate that this is really a new truck. The new roof profile does bring a feeling of headroom and there are lots of opportunities for overhead storage at the front rear and sides of the cabin’s interior.

That feeling of space is further enhanced by a simple rearranging of the geography. On previous models the bulkhead on which the bunk sat was directly behind the seats. By removing the storage beside the bunk at the rear of the cabin, the bunk and bulkhead have been moved backwards making more floor space on the engine cover. Although the adjustment is relatively small, it does have the effect of improving the feeling of living space.

When looking at what has changed and what has remained the same in the K Series cabin, there are 2.3m and 2.8m sleeper cabs on offer in the K220 with a comprehensive range of sleeper storage and bunk options accessible to the truck buyer.  The options vary from the 1.7m Day Cab, to a 2.3m aerodynamic roof sleeper, a 2.3m flat roof sleeper or a 2.8m aerodynamic roof sleeper.

Each option can come with side extenders, and the 2.3m and 2.8m aerodynamic versions are available with roof fairings.

what has changed and what has remained the same in the K Series cabin

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