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Test Driving the Scania Electric Semi

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PowerTorque’s European Correspondent, Will Shiers, has braved the severe winter cold and snowy terrain to bring us a story about test driving the Scania electric semi from Northern Norway across to Sweden.

One of the expected issues around electric trucks is their supposed difficulty in coping with extremely cold and extremely hot temperatures. According to Will, the Scania 40R was a joy to drive, even when the temperature was down to minus 23 degrees.

You can read the full story about Will’s Arctic adventure in the next issue of PowerTorque magazine, due out in the first week of May. Here is the link to subscribe and get your own copy of the magazine. https://powertorque.com.au/subscribe/

The battery pack, which stores electrical energy in Scania’s BEV trucks, these battery packs are made up of modules of lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxides cells (NMC), which Scania reckon are produced with minimal environmental footprint.

“We always make sure the capacity of the battery packs is optimised for the vehicle’s typical transport tasks and routes,” says Fredrik Sundén, an e-mobility developer at Scania Research & Development.

The direct current (DC) electricity stored in the battery needs to be converted into alternating current (AC) to power the electric motor. A power inverter or converter performs this conversion. AC motors are commonly used in electric vehicles because of their efficiency, power density and easier control of the motor speed.

The converted AC electricity is supplied to the electric motor. In Scania’s BEV trucks, the electric motor is a permanent magnet synchronous motor. This converts electrical energy into mechanical energy through a magnetic field in the stator, induced by the AC current, which in turn causes the permanently magnetised rotor to rotate. Scania currently offers three electric motors, ranging from 230 to 450 kW of continuous power.

“A combination of strong magnets and high voltage ensures that we achieve greater power and torque from the electric motor,” says Sundén.

 

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